LIBRARY IDEA FOR SEPTEMBER:

HISTORY OF BOOK CENSORSHIP: This presentation is perfect for Banned Books Week or as an introduction to book burning in Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451. The slides give a brief history of nine censorship and book banning incidents in world history.

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BOOK OF NIGHTCharlie Hall has never found a lock she couldn’t pick, a book she couldn’t steal, or a bad decision she wouldn’t make.

She’s spent half her life working for gloamists, magicians who manipulate shadows to peer into locked rooms, strangle people in their beds, or worse. Gloamists guard their secrets greedily, creating an underground economy of grimoires. And to rob their fellow magicians, they need Charlie Hall…

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12 YA Books for Women’s History Month — Featuring Strong Female Protagonists

Welcome back! I’m trying out an idea to promote YA books for Women’s History Month, and I am excited to hear what you think! This is an experiment, so bear with me as I may tweak it between this week and next week.

SKIPPING THE SPOTLIGHT IN MARCH

This is a special thing I want to try for Women’s History Month. To allow time to put it together, I am going to skip the New Release Spotlight for the remainder of this month. TBH, I’m considering replacing the New Release Spotlight with a post like this every Tuesday instead, and I’d love to hear your feedback on that.

I’m pretty excited about it because I know how helpful it can be to have promotional library materials ready to go, and that is my aim with this post. If you have feedback or ideas for posts like this, please leave a comment or email me at leigh[at]readerpants[dot]net. I truly love hearing from you and want to be as helpful as I can.

Next Tuesday, I plan to do a similar post for middle grade titles (Grades 3-7) for Women’s History Month. The March 22 post will be dedicated to picture books, and the March 29 post will be…well, I’m not sure yet. Again, your feedback is greatly appreciated!

All of today’s titles are for high school. A few may be okay for middle school, but many are labeled Grades 9-12 in professional reviews.

Want to show this presentation to your students? Add a copy of “12 YA Titles for Women’s History Month” to your Google Drive.

Prefer to print it? Add a copy of “12 YA Titles for Women’s History Month” (letter-sized version) to your Google Drive.

Add a printable list of all 12 YA books for Women’s History Month to your Google Drive.

SOME YA BOOKS FOR WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH ARE BRAND-NEW

This idea started with a plan to group new releases by themes within the New Release Spotlight, then put them together in a presentation you can use immediately in your libraries. When I started creating the presentation, however, I didn’t think it would be very helpful for librarians to show students all the new books the library doesn’t have yet (and maybe cannot get anytime soon).

So instead, I mixed a few new release titles with slightly older YA books for Women’s History Month. Hopefully, you have at least some of these older titles in your library. It’s also a chance to see what new releases your students are most interested in for the library.

The Lost Dreamer, Messy Roots, and One For All are all March 2022 releases. Hollow Fires will be released in May 2022. If you are a NetGalley member, both One for All and Hollow Fires are on there.

Act quickly on One for All because it will go away on NetGalley soon after it’s published on March 8, 2022. I just got my review copy of One for All today, so watch in the next couple of weeks for my “Librarian’s Perspective” review.

 

 

PREFER PPT OR PDF? HERE’S HOW TO CONVERT THE GOOGLE SLIDES VERSION:

This image shows how to download the YA Books for Women's History Month Google Slides presentation into a PPT or PDF. Click the link below the presentation to add it to your Google Drive. Then go to FILE--DOWNLOAD--and choose your format.Download a copy to your Google Drive (link above). From there, you can create a PowerPoint, PDF, or other format from there (FILE–DOWNLOAD–choose your format).

FEEL FREE TO EDIT AND ADD YOUR OWN TITLES

This presentation is totally editable, but please be careful not to edit the original version. This will change the entire presentation for everyone else, which you don’t want to do.

To ensure you are editing your own copy, be sure to use the link under the presentation to make a copy of the YA Titles for Women’s History Month presentation to your own Google Drive. Then, you can edit to your heart’s content!

THE FIRST SLIDE DOUBLES AS A DISPLAY SIGN!

If you are like me, you don’t change out your library displays as often as you’d like to. A lot of that problem for me was that I didn’t have time to make a new display sign. Until I got that sign created, I wouldn’t have a new display ready.

To make printing easier, I’ve created a US letter-sized version of this presentation. You can print directly from Google Slides, or you can save the presentation as a PDF and print the cover.

ALSO DOUBLES AS TOILET TALKERS (THIS PART IS MY FAVORITE!)

One of my favorite ways to promote library books is with Toilet Talkers. These are signs that I printed and put on the backs of the stall doors in student bathrooms around school. It’s the perfect location for a “captive audience” to read a description of a book from the library.

I recommend putting Toilet Talkers in student bathrooms after school. Or, you can ask student helpers to hang them for you. There is no need for you to be in a student restroom during school hours, plus some schools don’t allow staff in student restrooms anyway.

If you aren’t comfortable putting the Toilet Talkers in student restrooms, you can still place them in areas where students congregate or stand in line. Water fountains, the lunchroom line, bathroom sinks, and around the library are also great places to get student eyes on the Toilet Talkers.

MORE WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH

Women's History Month Digital Bulletin Board -- Grades 7-12 for middle school and high school libraries.Looking for a longer scrolling slide presentation for Women’s History Month? This one includes facts, trivia, Would-You-Rathers, and other fun stuff for Women’s History. It works for both middle school and high school.
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